The Rise of Branded and Personalised Video

2015 was widely regarded as the year that video marketing really took off. As we head into 2016, marketers will be looking into how they can use technology to further build on the huge potential of video marketing.

Increased Value of Branded Video Content

The power of YouTube will come to the fore again this year resulting in more companies making an extra effort to produce branded video content. Marketers are recognising the fact that YouTube is now the third most visited website in the world with more than four billion views per day.

‘The play button has become the most compelling call to action on the Web’ (Lessard, T).

Videos are becoming more popular among online users than traditional text-based pages. More and more marketers will move towards moving images, creating branded videos such as key interviews, behind-the-scenes insights and product promos to engage their target audience.

digital-video

 

More Videos Will Appear on Websites

Jayson DeMers (Forbes) suggested that there are two areas where video content is likely to show up:

  • Home pages – As this page is likely to be the first page seen on the website, it is vital that it is attractive for the viewer. If your homepage is engaging, the visitor will be more likely to spend more time exploring the website.
  • Product pages – To make sure that your product or service is sold effectively, videos are a great method of explaining what you offer. Using just text and still images can be difficult to understand if your product or service is complex or new to the market. With the use of short videos, customers will better understand the product and the purchasing process which can boost conversions.
The Revenant: 200 Miles website includes an interactive video in the background.

The Revenant: 200 Miles website includes an interactive video in the background.

Videos Will Play a Larger Role in Driving Sales

The inclusion of videos on websites brings us onto the next prediction that videos will play a larger role throughout the customer journey. From a recent survey by research firm Demand Metric, 74% of businesses reported that video content drove conversions more than any other content type.

With increased video content, customers will be guided through the purchase process. According to a recent study, customer testimonials, demos and explainer/tutorial videos were found to be the most effective at helping convert sales.

The Potential Rise of Personalised Video Content

 

Interactive, one-to-one, video content is forecasted to emerge in 2016 which will create a more conversational experience. New technologies will allow the viewers to fully engage with the video content to form a more immersed experience to potentially gain more customers. Features to look out for will be mid-roll surveys and questionnaires inserted into the videos as well as multiple choice options that the viewer can select to direct how the video content will continue.

Video personalisation will also enter the mainstream in 2016. The concept will involve the viewer’s name, company logo, or an image posted on social media placed into the video to bring the viewer into the story. Marketers will be hungry to create a more engaging, immersive experience by creating stories that are personally directed by the viewer.

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“Hey Look at Me!!” – How to Grab Your Viewers Attention

“That was sooo boring” is something no one wants to hear about their videos. Whether it’s in marketing or in film, you want to capture interest. This is the only time it’s really okay to crave attention, I mean really crave it. You want people to watch it, but what if you can’t get them past the first five seconds?

If you’re anything like me, YouTube is probably you best friend. I can spend hours on it and eventually, my fingers start to get tired constantly hitting the skip button (for now we’ll ignore the videos which I actually start and then decide to leave, that is a WHOLE other topic). However there have been two times, on record where my finger actually paused. The first one was the Pantene – Labels ad.

When it started, the music and the imagery made me wonder ‘where exactly is this going?’ So I just kept on watching.

The second incident was a lot more light-hearted. After searching, I can’t for the life of me remember the brand or find the advert, but I do remember everything else.

Basically, it started with a man who paused his wrestling match on TV, the doorbell rings and he goes to get his takeaway. This wasn’t the fun part. The fun part was the wrestlers. The hilarious conversation that ensued between the two stuck, paused in probably the most awkward position actually made me laugh out loud. It was like a “mature” Toy Story.

Have you noticed a trend yet?

Whether it was humour or intrigue, these ads had me hooked. They were interesting, so they caught my attention. So how do you grab attention?

Don’t waste those five seconds

You can’t get them back. I’ve seen so many ads that waste their time with a fade in, or a “well placed” logo and slogan. I can’t help but wonder why do that? They’ve given no real reason to keep watching so obviously, I skip. I feel no urge or need to continue to watch. Lets look at McDonalds…

They get straight to the point, leaving their well placed logo and slogan right to the end. Just how it should be, in my humble opinion. If you’re interested in the McRib, this will definitely hold your attention.

Be relevant, relevent, relevant

So, for whatever reason, Google decided that because I watch a lot of cute baby videos and family vlogs, I am definitely a soon too be mum. I’m not. I every time I watched a video I was hit by diapers, baby food and educational toys. Skip, skip AND skip. This is just time wasted for you as a marketer or video director and me, your humble viewer.

This is just down to knowing your audience, and knowing them well. If it’s catered to the right people, they will watch.

Targeting, video marketing, attention

Be interesting

Now this is  tricky one. How do you make something interesting?

Think of it as the way you think about people. What type of people do you find interesting? Now I’m not talking about people you like, the word is interesting. Daring, controversial, opinionated, funny, mysterious etc., that’s what you want in your five seconds, impact. This can be done with visuals, sounds or words. Just looking at some still work, you can see how strong a single image can be. Now image a strong video.

video marketing, attention

It’s great to have amazing videos and marketing, but if you can’t get your viewers attention you might just be wasting your time. So don’t wait, make your five seconds count!

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5 Ways To Boost Your Online Presence

We live in one of the most exciting times in the world’s history where you can build up a brand globally and faster then ever before. Over the last ten years there has been a major shift from traditional forms of marketing (think large scale, big budget Mad Men-esque advertising campaigns) to online marketing. Social media is a huge part of the rise in online marketing strategies and it has never been more accessible or affordable.

You now have the opportunity to build a personal brand by leveraging the amplification of social media, blogs and online video to share your messages and your business stories. If you are having trouble getting going, here are five simple ways business’s can grow their brand and online presence:

1.  Start a Blog

A good way to drive traffic to your site is to start a blog. Google loves blogs as they keep it’s search engine results recent and relevant with a constant stream of new and unique content. Blogging actively not only gives you a chance to share your knowledge and expertise with potential new customers, it also allows you to start an active dialogue with them via comment boxes on your posts.

2.  Keep Your Content Fresh and Unique

It’s a good idea to play to your strengths. If you are a great writer, then write. If you are more comfortable in front of a camera then maybe a video blog or audio podcast is the best way forward. Video bloggers such as Gary Vaynerchuk transformed their business with a video blog. Create Film will soon be launching our very own video blog sister site CreateFilm.TV were we will be utilising our knowledge of the film and video production industries to share our thoughts on current and trending topics.

3. Create a Twitter Account

Keep your Twitter account name consistent with your brand and blog. Used correctly Twitter is an excellent marketing tool in which you can communicate with your target market. The 140-character message limit forces you to be concise and relevant when posting content. Share your blog posts a couple of times a week via Twitter. Encourage people to interact with your content.

4. Create a Facebook “Page”

Facebook has a whopping 600 million users and provides a rich source of contacts to spread your content and get feedback from users interacting with your brand. Facebook also run advertising campaigns in which you can pay to promote your content further to reach new audiences or to simply get more people interacting with your page. As above, share your blog posts a couple of times a week via Facebook. Encourage people to interact with your content.

5. Utilise Video On Your Homepage

Online video is the fastest growing medium in the history of the Internet. Just like blogs, Google loves video. A great way to make your site instantly more engaging is to include an introduction video or case study film about your business on your homepage. A video offers a potential customer the chance to get to know what you do and how you can help. It also makes you more approachable by forging an instant connection between you and the customer by putting a face and a voice to the name.

Luckily for you, Orange Fox Studios specialise in helping small business’s delve into the world of online video and social media marketing. If you are having trouble or just need a little advice on how you can make your brand more engaging, please come and have a chat to us. The coffee is on us!

 

Further Reading:

10 Steps To Promote Brand “You” with Social Media

What is Social Media? The Must Know Basics Explained

Online Video: The Future of Content Marketing
 

 

 

Why viral videos are the way forward for the NHS

We are currently working on great project for Haemnet – a network for health care professionals who treat people with inherited bleeding disorders. It is a totally free service that provides a secure online space in which members can share information and experience about the care of people with bleeding disorders. Membership is open to specialist nurses, physiotherapists, data managers and social workers. You can visit the site at www.haemnet.com.

The NHS is always looking for new ways to spread public health messages and the project has prompted us to think about how we can take advantage of online video to disseminate healthcare messaging and reach and inform a larger audience. Video is one of the most powerful ways to reach people and if the idea is right you can connect on an intellectual and emotional level. Through a little research we found a useful article on The Guardian online which highlighted a couple of key case study campaigns.

The article opens with the reminder of one of the first acts of the coalition government back in 2010, when they slashed government advertising, although they made an exception for two campaigns on dementia and strokes.

 

“Hot Drinks Harm” – North Bristol NHS Trust

North Bristol hospital hosts the South West Children’s Burns Centre and has used video to spread awareness of the thousands of children every year who are injured by hot drinks. Their ‘Hot Drinks Harm’ campaign depicts a small boy pulling a cup of tea onto himself while his mother’s back is turned, causing him to suffer severe scalding on his cheek. The aim of the film was to raise awareness of the consequences of leaving hot drinks around children and, using social media, to get it disseminated as widely as possible.

Dr Amber Young, consultant paediatric anaesthetist at the centre, says “If you put a bland video up with education facts and figures, people aren’t going to use some of their valuable time to watch that. It’s got to be something that hooks them”. The video, which was created on a budget of £2,500 and used trainees from the City of Bristol college to do the make-up, has gone on to get nearly 14,000 views since it was published in 2011.

 

“Condom, No Condom?”

A year earlier an interactive series of videos launched to encourage young people to wear contraception. Created by primary care trust NHS Bristol and England’s NHS Choices website the video allowed viewers to decide whether a young male party-goer would wear a condom or not, before showing the consequences of his decision, which included pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. The video received almost 2million views, in part as a result of extensive media coverage after the Daily Mail ran a story branding the video as ‘pornographic’. However, with such traffic, the cost of the videos worked out less than 2p per visit, compared to around £32 for a face-to-face visit to a GP.

 

“Teenage Pregnancy Video” NHS Leicester City

Another example of NHS video campaigns hitting the headlines was NHS Leicester City primary care trust’s video in May 2009 of a young girl giving birth on a school field. The unbranded video, which was produced to look like amateur mobile phone footage, attracted huge amounts of press coverage and was removed by YouTube after 24 hours after receiving hundreds of complaints.

“It was the most shocking viral video any NHS has produced locally, even regionally, and because we had done our research with the young people and knew what they wanted, we hit are target market just right,” says Richard Morris, associate director of communications and engagement at NHS Leicester City. “This was a ‘social marketing campaign’ so it’s not about what we think is right or appropriate, it’s about the evidence we gained from our research about listening to our target audience, and producing something that gets them interested in key health messages in a discreet way.”

Costing £20,000 to produce, the video targeted girls, young people not in education, employment or training (Neets) and those in the west of the city, a pregnancy hot spot. It had been viewed 2m times by June 2009.

Article taken from the Guardian Online.

Great Storytelling Is Achievable With Advertising

“Stories, we all spend our life telling them… About this, about that. About people. But some are so good we wish they’d never end. They are so gripping, we would go without sleep to see a little bit more. Some stories bring us laughter, sometimes bring us tears. But isn’t that what a great story does?  Makes you feel? Stories that are so powerful, they really are with us forever…” – Dustin Hoffman, Sky Atlantic.

Advertising can be seen as a dirty word, and when you watch some of the TV ads that make their way onto the screen you can understand why. But it is definitely the best way to reach the widest audience and when done well, you can incorporate great brand storytelling.

More and more businesses are finding ways to tell a narrative tale through their advertising. Even the incredibly annoying Go Compare adverts have become an ongoing saga, with the excruciating Tenor now a tragi-comic character who is trying to find new ways to communicate his message after being blown up, fired into a Black Hole and god-knows what else. It might do your head in every time you see it, but you have to admit that it’s pretty clever.

Another example of narrative storytelling are the BT Broadband flatmates adverts. It helps that the three actors in the ads are all well-cast and talented actors in their own right. The acting and the writing is actually better than the majority of dramas of soaps that you see on the likes of BBC Three, ITV2 and E4. BT’s budget obviously helps in this regard, but it’s simple storytelling that everybody could do. Good scripts, talented actors and a solid film-making team don’t have to cost the world.

The BT Broadband advertising story goes back over three years, with Love Actually’s Kris Marshall starring as a young man dating an older woman who has two kids from a previous marriage. It followed his story from awkward exchanges with the kids all the way up to their marriage, and the story now follows the young son as he ventures off to university. It could quite easily have been a comedy-drama on BBC One, but it’s advertising. Really great marketing.

Here ‘s an examples of the BT Broadband story. See how brilliantly their stories are told, and how simple the storytelling is. You don’t need to smash your customers over the head with flashy visuals and manic editing, you can draw them in with simple, concise storytelling:

BT Broadband Story

It might not be within every businesses budget and marketing plan to have an ongoing advertising campaign, but this shouldn’t hold you back. You can still tell an incredible story with a one-off advertisement. Again, it doesn’t have to break the budget and be a 90 second version of James Cameron’s Avatar to grab the audience’s attention, it just needs to tell a great story.

Take a look at these two advertisements from Sky Atlantic and McDonald’s. Don’t be fooled by the size of the corporations behind these adverts: These are both achievable without millions of pounds behind them. Dustin Hoffman may have cost Sky a few quid, but it’s not the Oscar winning actor that grabs the attention. It’s the words he uses, the music in the background and the message it delivers: Great storytelling is here.

The McDonald’s ad tells the audience that everybody has McDonald’s in common, and it does it with a simple tale that a lot of us can relate to. Take away the McDonald’s banner at the end and you could quite easily be fooled into thinking this was a short film by Shane Meadows. The subtlety of the piece gets the message across without the use of a sledgehammer and it stays with you longer as a result. That’s what a great story does, and what great advertising can do when there is a great story being told within it.

Sky Atlantic Ad with Dustin Hoffman

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